Aug 2, 2010

Jack and Jill: Last Verse





















































"Now Jack did laugh and Jill did cry
But her tears did soon abate;
Then Jill did say that they should play
At see-saw across the gate."
 
 
The 4th verse of Jack and Jill according to wiki.
 
The genesis of this composition comes from the superb artist Daniel Powers. Take a look at his blog and I'm sure you will be inspired. And of course there is equally superb artist Roberto who reminded me of the value of the glance in directing a viewer through the work.
 
Thanks for looking. There's nothing like a few variations. I'll be back tomorrow and visit! Please click for big. :)





38 comments:

  1. Hello andrew, I'm seriously thinking of changing my place of residence of the terrestrial meridian, because I always turn to be the first to comment on. (And if I did not copy some of the comments of others do not know what to say)

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  2. Well, Daniel Powers reminds me of Van Gogh's drawings.
    Very expressive, obviously.
    Your work is spectacular, for me, the one I prefer is the woman with the pipe.
    A magical atmosphere. Very good composition. The soft pastel colors offer a quiet, calm, drowsy. (I did not read the text.) I like the detail of the dog that enters from the right, because to be cut in half, suggests that the scene does not end at the boundaries of illustration, understand?. Well, a jewel!

    No joke: a hug and a kiss.

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  3. maybe here is the soul of Ieronimus Bosch, no do you believe?

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  4. Maybe Cranach...(in some aspects).

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  5. Eeeeeh...I go to sleep. (All aspects)

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  6. Heya Roberto, thank you for being so kind and observant! Ah yes, the indication of a world outside a world - I suppose I can thank D'Egas for that with his cropped figures and horses.

    That woman with the pipe :) She is also the old witch in Hansel and Gretel. Here she is Mrs Dobs who fixed Jack's head. The pastel colours well I up the saturation and glazed a purple over those distant hills (in Oz we have 'blue' mountains!)

    And Bosch? Wouldn't it be great? But I think he had nightmares. And Cranach? Can you believ I only heard of him last year when I saw his adam and eve painting. I printed it out and took it into the studio and showed one of my friends and he said "Oh that's Cranach!" Heh. My education is lacking!

    With this one I went for the medieval feel, and tried to make it kid friendly (child friendly).

    thanks again for your kind intelligent comments

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  7. oh Andrew, are all so beautifull, full of magic and poesie too...
    I like those works so much, really you are so talented and sensible, only a sensible aoul can make somthings like this,

    magic

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  8. uuhhhmmmmm...Bruegel?
    Would be better?...Ja ja ja!!!

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  9. Love those dancey houses!! And the cow on the hill... and the skies-- magnificent!

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  10. Hi, Andrew! When I look at this work, I'm really humbled to think that perhaps my drawing influence your richly set scenes! These are wonderful. And it's fun reading your banter with Roberto about art-historical influences. Nice work!

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  11. I love Daniel Powers work too. I also agree with his comment, it is fun reading your banter with Roberto and Amalia. I love these, I especially love the 13th one down, wow, so many. I love the colors, the tilt of the house the path leading through the illustration.

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  12. Whoa, careful there, Jack. You could fling Jill off the see saw and into a tree!! Now that would probably make her cry again... :D

    Anyway, your intensive use of crows is still giving me the chills. And I realize that combining that with a nursery rhyme is like buying candy at a morgue. Twisted, creepy and fun? Hhm. A strange combination, but very Finnie-like, of course. Hey, maybe we could call it Finniesm? :))

    Well, that moon is shining so brilliantly, I must say. I will keep coming back to see it when I feel like changing into a werewolf. Oops, didn't I tell you that I'm one? :)

    Heheh.

    Incredible work, Monsieur. One of these days I will have to send you a blue ribbon or a medal. Or maybe..umm..boots? Oh, no, no. I don't like boots. Well, a piece of steak, then! :D :D :D

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  13. I read Karen's comment and I am ashamed of myself! Have I been blabbering too much on your blog?? Well, I best behave now and keep my big mouth shut.

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  14. Hhm. My mouth is shut. But my fingers can't seem to stop. Sorry... Oh, well.

    Heheheehee... :))

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  15. Hello, Andrew! I had to use again "My Humpty Dumpty Book of Nursery Rhymes" in order to comment, but it didn't help me at all this time! So what I'll say concerns your illustrations, not the interpretation of the nursery rhyme... I love the way you show different moments of the day by changing some elements of the background and the surroundings - the sky, the birds, the smoke in the chimneys, the stunning moon... I like the dogs, jumping and playing in different places and directions and thus strengthening the joy of the playing children that remain almost in the same positions. It's so nice that you find inspiration in different artists,I'm sure you inspire someone, too!:)

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  16. Hey, what is saying that girl?
    She is talking anphibological, you know ...Indirectly she is saying that my comments are funny because I blablalbalbalblalba and bla bla bla bla bla blablablablabla and more bla bla bla bla bla bla bla bla bla bla bla bla and then bla bla bla bla bla blabla bla bla bla bla bla bla and a day bla bla bla bla bla bla bla bla bla because bla bla bla bla bla, you know, bla bla bla bla bla bla bla bla bla bla bla bla bla blablablalbalbalblalba and all this surrounded by bla bla bla bla bla bla bla !!!!! !This is unacceptable
    Ah, I forgot to tell: Bla!

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  17. hello, I'm wirting from Santiago de Compostela in Spain, I just found your blog.
    I like your world, is a great mikrocosmos... and I like too your work, thanks for all of this,and for share with.
    Felisa
    I'll back here.

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  18. Wow! I step out of the room for a few days, and you´ve made illustrations for a whole new book! And it´s sequel!
    You´re village-houses look exactly like the english villages I´ve visited in Surrey and Kent this weekend. Although here it seems more like hobbit-land. (Which is also down-under, isn´t it?)

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  19. Hi Andrew! I am always in a state of awe and at a loss for intelligent words when I look at your amazing work! Your attention to detail is incredible and I can't believe you do all this digitally.

    Andrew, I just answered your question on my blog, but I may have misunderstood what you mean by digital transfers. If so, ask away again... :-) Silke

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  20. Delightfully spooky, just enough to send little ones off to dreamland! Was the "face" on the house to the right intended? It seems to be watching over the kids partially shaded, adding an ominous quality. You have a gift, sir! :o)

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  21. Wonderful, Andrew!! Lovely work, yet again. These illustrations are fantastic - love the movement in the composition as well as the amazing atmospheric feel that you have created with your palette - the brightness of the scene behind the focal point is like a hit of sunshine. Great work, my friend! Thank you SO much for your visits and kindness..I really appreciate it and I hope you know I enjoy seeing that pirate avatar of yours. Take care!

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  22. There is something rather magical about your work and incredibly unique too, I don't think I've ever seen anything quite like it! There's just so much attention to detail. I especially like the scenery in these images, I feel like I've been swept away into a totally different world when I look at these.

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  23. Laura thank you! Sensible? I actually tell people that I only work at my day job three days a week because of my pschye problem... I noticed some people have started to believe me :)

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  24. Roberto ah yes Bruegel and Bosch -- I love them both. I stumbled on a few Watteau's I liked last night, much to my surprise - I like the feeling he elicits rather than the image... at least I think I do.

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  25. Krista, than kyou very much. The dancy houses - what a good name. The inspiration for bent came from Daniel Powers. He reminds me of things I have forgotten to learn!

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  26. Speaking of Daniel. Thank you Daniel, I learn something whenever I visit your blog!

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  27. Karen. Hi! Thanks for picking that one out. There's a lot of things going every which way in that. I think I am just the composer rather than the orchestra!

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  28. Amalia, no no, you never type too much. I had the same thoughts, like ... what if he lets her go, after all, he owes her one! Or does he. Boots and all.

    Hmm Cat in boots looks good for next

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  29. rossichka, thank you for being so observant. My problem is that I can never make up my mind. Hence the so many versions and variations. It's good and bad. Imagine what I am like picking carpet? :) :)

    And also I just love that witche's nose on your site. Thankyou for letting me borrow it when I come to visit!

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  30. Hola Ernesto! From Santiago de Compostela! Wow, I have seen the St Jacques shells inlaid in the pilgrims way in France, but that is all.

    Thank you for coming to visit my work. I see you too have an admiration for elephants.!!! Especially balancing ones. beautiful extremes.

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  31. Roberto, well today I have learnt a new word and an example "duardum occidere nolite timere bonum est". I never knew of the word "Amphibology" though I knew of the importance of where to place the comma!

    cheers from Oz :)

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  32. Haha Janne, welcome back.

    England looks swinging! Hobbits? , but of course the English are all much shorter than Australians. The average height here is six nine, and we all the men weigh just under 67 kilos - muscle isnt as heavy as you'd expect after a hard day at the beach :).

    I covet your voyages and your eye for the telling detail, now those castles could provide great textures!!

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  33. Silke. Hi and thank you too for your kindness. That last work of yours is wonderfully dynamic - in all sorts of ways. Thankyou for getting back to me on the Uv stabiliser et al. Ahh the digital transfers, yes there appears to be many methods and I will certainly ask you questions!

    :)

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  34. Michele, thank you very much. The face, well it was an accident, but now that you mention it, I think it is a wonderful idea. faces in rocks, and walls and skies....!!!! Nice and creepy!

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  35. Shirley, oh it's wonderful to visit your blog. Your illustrations dance! Oh I need to fix my pirate face :) I just can't seem to find a better picture of me.

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  36. Vanilla, thank you! The detail? Oh I just keep adding things till I feel I cannot add any more.I run into image cliche- a star here, a bird there, a strung up goose on the wall. The trap for me is to add it all!!

    You know the images are all, like novels, in that they are abandonned works. When I paint in the real world I always try and abandon the painting before it is finished. You know the tendency is always to add just another brushtroke.... and wreck it :)

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  37. Andrew, yesterday I wrote you something on the "nose subject" in my blog...:)))

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  38. Hey Rossichka! Thanks, I saw it :) I am keen to try the nose thankyou! :)

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Hya! Thank you so much for leaving a comment. I appreciate your time and thoughts.